Japanese kelp soup stock (Kombu Dashi)

Japanese kelp soup stock (Kombu Dashi)

Kelp is a food containing a lot of glutamic acid. This glutamic acid is one of the elements of the umami component and it is also an important element when you cook Japanese food. This kelp stock(Kombu Dashi) can be used in many Japanese recipes. For example... miso soup, Japanese rolled omelette, Seasoned rice with vegetables, Boiled seasoned vegetables.

Shiitake soup stock (Shiitake Dashi)

Shiitake soup stock (Shiitake Dashi)

This soup stock made from fish and kelp is the most famous soup stock in Japan, and Shiitake stock is one of the essential soup stocks for Japanese cuisine because of its unique aroma and flavor. The sweet and soft scent of shiitake soup stock is an important element of traditional Japanese cuisine. In addition to noodle soup, seasoning rice, seasoning and scenting stewed foods, we will introduce how to make important soup stock which is the basis of many Japanese food recipes.

Japanese Anchovy soup stock (Iriko Dashi)

Japanese Anchovy soup stock (Iriko Dashi)

"Iriko Dashi" means Anchovy soup stock. In Japan people call them "Iriko Dashi" or "NIboshi Dashi". In Western region of Japan ( in Kyoto or Osaka ) People call them "Iriko Dashi".

Japanese bonito soup stock (Katsuo Dashi)

Japanese bonito soup stock (Katsuo Dashi)

bonito flakes(Katsuobushi) is a food rich in inosinic acid, which is one of the umami ingredients. The bonito stock(Katsuo Dashi) made from this bonito flakes is one of the important soup stocks used in all Japanese recipes. By the way, bonito flakes are foods made by drying bonito, and are generally smoked. In addition to the smoked drying method, there is also a method of drying with mold like cheese, but the bonito flakes made by this method are treated as high-grade products. From this bonito soup, you can add ramen, miso soup, and other essential umami ingredients that are the source of the umami of various Japanese recipes. Therefore, this bonito stock is indispensable for Japanese food. The scent is also a very important factor. When I close my eyes and smell this scent, I can see the face of my grandmother and the memories of my childhood.

How to cook rice without rice cooker

How to cook rice without rice cooker

Cooking rice is seems very simple, but "wash rice", "Amount of water", "cook at the right heat", these elements make a big difference in the taste of rice. Especially for simple and delicate dishes such as sushi, properly cooked rice is indispensable.

Grated yam rice (Tororo Gohan)

Grated yam rice (Tororo Gohan)

It's a simple Japanese local dish in which yams grated with grater are seasoned with soup stock, soy sauce, and mirin, and then eaten over rice. Because it's a simple dish, you can add miso instead of soy sauce, or add soup stock to suit your taste. It is a dish where you can enjoy various tastes.

Japanese old fashioned sweets Anko (Red beans paste)

Japanese old fashioned sweets Anko (Red beans paste)

It's a standard Japanese sweets, but in general, it is rare to eat only bean paste. Generally, you can wrap the Anko with rice, or wrap the rice with the Anko. etc... Also, bitter green tea goes well when eating the Anko.

Japanese old fashioned sweets "Botamochi"

Japanese old fashioned sweets "Botamochi"

Botamochi is a very homely Japanese sweets. I remember that Grandmom and mom made botamochi and we had it with whole family. That's why botamochi reminds me of my childhood memories. Previously, each family used to make botamochi by themselves, but nowadays it is common to buy botamochi at shops. Usually the homemade botamochi is less sweet than the botamochi sold at stores, and I prefer the unique handmade feeling. Botamochi made at home is less sweet than the botamochi sold at stores, and I like the taste and unique handmade feel of each home. In this recipe, we have introduced botamochi made with red bean paste, but sesame and kinako (roasted soybean flour) are also popular.

Green onion with miso (Negi miso)

Green onion with miso (Negi miso)

You will find this recipe is unusual recipe. Because normally Miso is used as a ingredient for soup such as miso soup. Actually This recipe is absolutely typical Japanese recipe for Japanese people. with rice, with tofu and As a rice ball ingredient etc... You can eat in various ways.

Frozen tofu (Koya tofu, Kori tofu)

Frozen tofu (Koya tofu, Kori tofu)

"Tofu Hyakuchin" is a cookbook about tofu published in 1782. This tofu cookbook became a bestseller and a pioneer of cookbooks in Japan. This frozen tofu is a dish that is also introduced in "Tofu Hyakuchin". This tofu dish is unfamiliar in Europe, but it is a common tofu dish for Japanese people. Frozen tofu (Kori dofu) is also known as Koya tofu. (There is a difference in how to make it)

Simmered shitake (shitake no nishime)

Simmered shitake (shitake no nishime)

Simmered shitake (shitake no nishime) is a typical Japanese home cooking that reminds me grandma. It is a simple dish made by simmer soup stock, soy sauce, sake and vegetables until the soup is evaporates. This recipe will show you how to make simmered shiitake (shiitake no nishime) simmered shitake (shitake no nishime) can also be used as ingredients for sushi such as Chirashi Zushi.

Simmered koya tofu (Koya tofu no fukumeni)

Simmered koya tofu (Koya tofu no fukumeni)

This recipe cooks Koya tofu (or shimi tofu) instead of regular tofu. Koya tofu has many small cavities inside, and when the soup enters these cavities, it produces a juicy taste and a unique texture than regular tofu.

 Fried tofu fritter (Ganmodoki)

Fried tofu fritter (Ganmodoki)

This cuisine is a tofu cuisine inspired by Portuguese cuisine. The origin of this dish is unknown, but it appears in a tofu recipe book published in 1782. "Ganmodoki" is a delicious Japanese home-cooked dish that can be added with ginger soy sauce or simmerd with vegetables.